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A03 TANAKA, Motomu |Proposed Research Projects (2016-2017)

Paper | Original Paper

2016

Viktoria Frank, Stefan Kaufmann, Rebecca Wright, Patrick Horn, Hiroshi Yoshikawa, Patrick Wuchter, Jeppe Madsen, Andrew Lewis, Steven P. Armes, Anthony D. Ho, and *Motomu Tanaka,
Frequent mechanical stress suppresses proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells from human bone marrow without loss of multipotency,
Scientific Reports 6, 24264 (2016).

[Summary] Mounting evidence indicated that human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are responsive not only to biochemical but also to physical cues, such as substrate topography and stiffness. To simulate the dynamic structures of extracellular environments of the marrow in vivo, we designed a novel surrogate substrate for marrow derived hMSCs based on physically cross-linked hydrogels whose elasticity can be adopted dynamically by chemical stimuli. Under frequent mechanical stress, hMSCs grown on our hydrogel substrates maintain the expression of STRO-1 over 20 d, irrespective of the substrate elasticity. On exposure to the corresponding induction media, these cultured hMSCs can undergo adipogenesis and osteogenesis without requiring cell transfer onto other substrates. Moreover, we demonstrated that our surrogate substrate suppresses the proliferation of hMSCs by up to 90% without any loss of multiple lineage potential by changing the substrate elasticity every 2nd days. Such “dynamic in vitro niche” can be used not only for a better understanding of the role of dynamic mechanical stresses on the fate of hMSCs but also for the synchronized differentiation of adult stem cells to a specific lineage

Mariam Veschgini, F. Gebert, Nyamdorj Khangai, H. Ito, Ryo Suzuki, Thomas W. Holstein, Yasushi Mae, Takero Arai, and *Motomu Tanaka,
Tracking mechanical and morphological dynamics of regenerating Hydra tissue fragments using a two fingered micro-robotic hand,
Applied Physics Letters 108, 103702 (2016).

[Summary] Regeneration of a tissue fragment of freshwater polyp Hydra is accompanied by significant morphological fluctuations, suggesting the generation of active forces. In this study, we utilized a two fingered micro-robotic hand to gain insights into the mechanics of regenerating tissues. Taking advantage of a high force sensitivity (~1 nN) of our micro-hand, we non-invasively acquired the bulk elastic modulus of tissues by keeping the strain levels low (ε < 0.15). Moreover, by keeping the strain at a constant level, we monitored the stress relaxation of the Hydra tissue and determined both viscous modulus and elastic modulus simultaneously, following a simple Maxwell model. We further investigated the correlation between the frequency of force fluctuation and that of morpho- logical fluctuation by monitoring one “tweezed” tissue and the other “intact” tissue at the same time. The obtained results clearly indicated that the magnitude and periodicity of the changes in force and shape are directly correlated, confirming that our two fingered micro-hand can precisely quantify the mechanics of soft, dynamic tissue during the regeneration and development in a non- invasive manner.